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in a northern city and mali. the french-led a forces recaptured the city last month that they have since been on alert. on saturday, there is a suicide bomber blew itself up a separate -- and a security checkpoint. no one was injured. one day earlier, a soldier was wounded when another suicide bomber targeted the same outpost. >> the suicide attack in the biggest city in the north of mali is significant because it's the second such attack since friday. on friday morning, we saw the first suicide attack since the conflict began since the french arrived. the suicide attacks on the city seemed to be a change of tactics. most of the armed groups that occupied the city and others had been pushed out by air strikes from the french and dutch troops from a ballet. -- troops from mali. but they worry that laying explosives rises on the road could increase the coming months and people of mali will be worried about how they have to deal with it. they're not used to dealing with guerrilla tactics like this and the french have said they're keen to pull out as soon as possible. whoever is left, whether it'
effectively stateless. >> in mexico city investigators say that a gas leak caused last week's explosion at the state- run oil company. 37 people were killed, dozens were injured. an electrical fault triggered a spark in the building's basement. mexico city has been relatively safe from the drug war that has engulfed the rest of the country, but the violence is now moving into the capital. >> police checkpoints like this are more common these days in mexico city, an effort to keep rising violence from reaching the heart of the country. throughout the six year drug war in mexico, mexico city is one of the places least touched by violence. there were 84 murders around the capital in january, the highest death toll since 2007. in many cases these were mass killings where bodies were left mutilated or dismembered. authorities here blamed a turf war and the local police chief says that mexico city needs to be better prepared in case it spreads. >> i have the impression that mexico city's leaders know that could be short-m lived. >> they are actually safer than many cities in the world, with a
. >>> an unprecedented tragedy in santa cruz. two veteran police officers shot to death. they are the city's first officers to be killed in the line of duty. we have team coverage. ktvu's janine de la vega is learning more about the officers and getting community reaction. but we begin with tara moriarty with new information on the shooting and the suspect. tara? >> reporter: we understand the suspect lived a couple of houses down the street. behind me is actually doyle street. police say after the suspect killed two officers over on branciforte drive, he came here and it appears he was shot in front of this garage. now, there were too many bullet holes to count. several garages are strung together in this complex and at least half of them were riddled with holes, chunks of one door even missing. we also spotted bullet holes on a nearby van. two cars were towed earlier this morning from the scene. one of them had two bullet holes through the front windshield. loren baker and elizabeth butler were both killed during a confrontation yesterday afternoon about a mile from the beach on branciforte aven
in south america, until they dropped off the grid. coming up, the last >>> in the heart of the city behind ucsf, there is an urban forest filled with trees, some over 200 feet tall. noah walker tells us why tens of thousands of these trees could be cut down. >> reporter: frank, it's my first time to this place, it's a beautiful area. this manmade forest was planted more than 100 years ago. ucsf, which owns the property says some unnatural growth poses a fire hazard and other potential risks. there are a few places you can leave the city behind, and still be in the city. >> that's the most magic part about it. >> reporter: you can hike without seeing another single soul. 61acres of tall trees, and lush undergrowth. a plant population as diverse as the city. maybe too diverse. ucsf is proposing removal of up to 30,000 nonnative trees, like eucalyptus. >> our friends, the eucalyptus trees have ways of multiplying. >> you're just allowing us to talk to a wall. >> reporter: speakers had mixed reviews of uc's forest management plan. >> i'm not a native. perhaps i should go. the buildings aren't
after a crash that killed at least 19 foreign tourists near the ancient egyptian city. witnesses said the balloon exploded mid flight. two people survived the crash, including the egyptian pilot. caught air ballooning is one of the main dr. oz for the huge number of tourists who visit luxor each year. the seven city on the banks of the nile is near the valley of the kings. the pharaoh burial ground as the 60 tunes in chambers, including tut. there is also a vast temple complex with the ruins of religious buildings. more from our reporter in cairo. >> it appears there was an explosion on board the balloon when it was around 300 meters or so from the ground. the balloon then came plummeting down, at which 0.1 of the tourists on board, we understand that the british male tourist jump from the balloon. we understand from the ministry of tourism that they contacted the relevant embassies, which includes china, japan, hungary, france, and britain, to coordinate the response and how to get the bodies back home. of course, this comes as a huge blow for the egyptian tourist -- tourism industry
study. castel gandolfo elong stu vatican city, much like a foreign -- castel gandolfo belongs to vatican city, much like a foreign embassy. benedict will return to vatican city. in the future, he will reside just a few meters away. it is being refurbished in preparation for his arrival. a last kiss for the poope. his decision to resign ahas received extreme action. joining us is our -- has received a mixed reaction. >> joining us is our conflict from -- our contact from rome. is there cause for concern? >> i think there is cause for some concern. that's why he promised in his last address to the cardinals -- he promised reverence and obedience. it's also why he is hiding away behind the walls of vatican city states and not returning to his beloved the very a in southern germany for his retirement -- beloved of area -- beloved bugbear yet -- beloved bavaria in southern germany. the new pope has to be charismatic, forceful, has to put his own stamp very quickly on the papacy. >> who will be in charge of the catholic church until the new pope is elected? >> the cardinal will take care of th
near the northern city of aleppo. they say they've captured fighter jets and a large number of weapons. they say some of the planes appear to be in working order. rebels seized syria's largest dam on monday. they've been launching attacks on aleppo's international airport. government troops have responded with air strikes on aleppo and the capital damascus. opposition activists say more than 50 people died in the latest fighting. >>> a man has attacked people in the u.s. pacific territory of guam with a knife. local police say he killed two people and he wounded at least 12 other people, 11 of them japanese. the man reportedly slammed his car into a shop in the busy tourist district of tumon. then he started attacking people. hospital officials say the two dead were japanese women. they say the wounded include an 8-month-old baby and a 3-year-old child. fire officials say three people died. police say they've detained a 21-year-old american resident of guam. >>> japanese exporters and stock investors have seen the decline of the yen and have cheered it on, but today they're seeing a di
widespread destruction in what was one of the deadliest attacks in the city in several months. >> moments after the blast, the military headquarters in the city came under mortar attacks. the government is blaming terrorists. >> syrian state tv broadcast images of the attack. the car bomb hit a security checkpoint near the headquarters of the ruling party and the russian embassy. opposition activists say most of the victims were civilians, though that cannot be confirmed. the blast damaged a number of cars and buildings in the surrounding area. >> this is terrorism. this is a crime. >> a huge cloud of smoke rose above the city center. shortly after that bombing, there were reports of at least two other explosions in the syrian capital. state media have described the attacks as the work of terrorists. the syrian opposition abroad like here in cairo believes the regime of the president has long been on the back foot. they are opposed to his latest offer of talks. >> it means nothing as long as our cities and people are being bombed and the regime continues to kill, imprisoned, and torture s
kerry returned to the city he once called home. the first stop on the visit was for a chat with young berliners. discussions of a different kind with the chancellor. high on their agenda -- foreign policy and the economy, but first these comments on the relationship with the u.s. >> i record a great deal of importance to transatlantic ties. we do not just have common values. we also face common tasks. >> a number of these challenges were discussed at an earlier meeting with kerry's german counterpart. first and foremost, the plans for a new free trade deal between the u.s. and europe. >> germany is our largest trade partner in europe, and we want to see even more trade and investment that will create jobs -- jobs for -- jobs for germans, for americans, for all europeans. >> negotiations are set to begin within months, and i of the two sides managed to overcome their differences, could be completed within two years. >> for more on this visit now, we can bring in our political correspondent, who is standing by at our parliamentary studios. afghanistan, syria, a possible u.s./e you free
city, which is why so many people are angry and afraid. >> the government does not do enough. today they died. tomorrow it will be us. >> pakistan's military and government do not seem to have a clear policy on fighting sectarianism in the province. a supporter once she is who have to leave.hiwants shias they refused to bury the dead in protest. the prime minister responded by firing the regional government and promising better security. that has clearly not happened. the government has been driven -- given 48 hours to respond to demands made by shia community leaders, who promise more angry leaders if they are -- protest that they are not met. saturday's attacks shows that those who want to target shias can operate in some parts of pakistan with impunity, despite promises made by the government. al jazeera, karachi. >> pakistan's interior minister says the government will protect the shia community. >> i have spoken this afternoon to the police. they will hunt those guys, wherever they are. it is coming from our shared enemy. we have started exercising control. there is some kind o
three cities. an egyptian man who appears in a video being beaten by police has security forces -- says security forces made him change his story. he is shown being stripped and bundled into of them in cairo. on sunday he appeared on egyptian television saying protesters attacked him, but now he says it is the police. more from cairo. >> this story has gripped the country for the past two days, and much of it was happening live on television. it was friday when this man who was beaten up and humiliated, drive naked under the eyes of the egyptians or saturday when he appeared again saying this was the protesters who had beaten him up or again today when he appeared saying it was the police who beat him up. it caused a huge embarrassment for the government. they are saying, here is approved in the pudding. this is why we will keep the pressure from the streets. the government has been very quiet. we only heard from the interior ministry spokesman who did say he did apologize. he did take responsibility, and we did say there would be an investigation carried out. >> the least 15 people are
will be in the area where you live. >>> in the heart of the city behind ucsf, there is an urban forest filled with trees, some over 200 feet tall. noah walker tells us why tens of thousands of these trees could be cut down. >> reporter: frank, it's my first time to this place, it's a beautiful area. this manmade forest was planted more than 100 years ago. ucsf, which owns the property says some unnatural growth poses a fire hazard and other potential risks. there are a few places you can leave the city behind, and still be in the city. >> that's the most magic part about it. >> reporter: you can hike without seeing another single soul. 61acres of tall trees, and lush undergrowth. a plant population as diverse as the city. maybe too diverse. ucsf is proposing removal of up to 30,000 nonnative trees, like eucalyptus. >> our friends, the eucalyptus trees have ways of multiplying. >> you're just allowing us to talk to a wall. >> reporter: speakers had mixed reviews of uc's forest management plan. >> i'm not a native. perhaps i should go. the buildings aren't native. perhaps they should go. >> it
. >> i think people are getting more sensitive to it as it happens in new york city. there's a big issue to their policies as they relate to stopping and frisking. stores don't want to be shoplifted with. but you have to make sure and identity and have some reasonable basis to do it, just not look at the color of someone's skin and say, you know what, i'm going to pat/frisk you. in the future, it makes it better, but it's more unfortunate that incidents like this go on. >> this is a major issue in new york city. there's a class action lawsuit pending in federal court. people in the african-american/hispanic community say that cops are abusing them repeatedly. this is a big issue. of course, now, the police were not involved in this incident, but it sheds light on it and i think it sheds light on how african-american citizens get -- >> i think we have to see a more forest whitaker movies. >> thanks for watching "newsroom." "newsroom international" is next. >> welcome, to "newsroom international. account account i'm suzanne malveaux. today i'm joined by michael holmes. >> nice to be here.
are demanding his overthrow after the demonstrations in several cities in recent days turn violent and dozens were killed. >> earlier in the day, there were scuffles in the center of tahrir square, the focal point of the revolution that overthrew president hosni mubarak two years ago. protests marking the second anniversary of the uprising that toppled mubarak have killed nearly 60 people since january 25, prompting the head of the army to warned this week that the state was on the verge of collapse. our correspondent is in cairo for us. we are hearing about water cannon shots being fired. how serious is the tension there at the moment? >> it basically escalated in the last hours. we have peaceful demonstrations at tahrri square and at the presidential palace, but demonstrators tried to break through the barriers at the international palace. police acted with tear gas, then the demonstrators threw molotov cocktails. we have the same blame game going on. the presidency says that the parties who organized the protest are responsible for today's violence while one of the opposition leaders said
has sparked mass protests in several major cities. now this report. >> the people here are pretty much aware of the implications of the assassination and the uncertainty that looms over the country. this is by the political establishment yesterday had a quick fix the problem. prime minister hamdi jebali said that he offered the technocratic government, refusing -- saying the offer to dissolve the government. the party says that it rejects a technocratic offer and they intend to stay in power. the other opposition parties want to include everyone in the talks and they don't want a democratic government. >> an inquiry by australia's top criminal investigation leaders has found widespread doping in professional sport. links to organized crime and the possibility of a match fixing. scandals damaging the ssport andy of e around a world-class -- sport around the world. >> australia has a reputation not just being good at sports but for having clean sports. bad reputation right now seems to be in trouble. this report outlines wide scale doping across our whole range of exports. this is not ju
strip in a city not easily shocked. it started at 4:30 a.m. someone in a black range rover with dealer plates fired into this maz rat tea killing the driving causing it to go out of control. it continued through an intersection and smashed into this car. hard to tell, but that is a taxi cab. it burst into flame. the driver and passenger trapped inside died. >> it's possible that the cab may have been running on propane. they are investigating the engineering and mechanicals of that vehicle. >> reporter: still on the loose, the black range rover with dealer plates. a common vehicle here. police warning that the occupants are armed and dangerous. >> very dark, tinted windows and occupied multiple times by black males. >> reporter: now, we expect that las vegas police will be holding a press conference shortly, in about an hour, about 5:00 p.m. eastern time, wolf. we're going to try to bring that to you live. we hope to learn more details about how this thing played out. we do know that police have requested video from all of the major hotels on this part of the strip. so they are hoping
. it was his stewardship that the lakers brought basketball to this great city. you can't understa state it, th power of this one individual. and the championships, yes? >> no question about it, to follow on what the mayor just articulated in this statement. for those of us that live here in los angeles, the city of los angeles county, it is hard to explain to people that live outside of this region how passionate lakers fans are. and the connection between the lakers and the city of los angeles. there's a pride. there's a confidence that the people actually experience through the success of the lakers over the years. and so, dr. buss not only created great sports, great entertainment, but i think he also helped to vitalize and revitalize the city at times where the fans sand the people really became part of the lakers. and helped kind of drive the success that happened on the court. >> and, jim, do we have any information -- do we know where we go from here? how is the family going to be celebrating, how are they going to be mourning, and how do they include this huge community that really wan
. these not going to affect mass shootings. >> most people die in this country in gun violence, which is inner city -- >> but there's no constituency for that. >> there's a huge constituency for that. every mayor in america would like that. if you're going to have a comprehensive solution, you're going to have to deal with mental health. you can talk about video games. joe's going to need to deal with guns. maybe universal background check has a realistic chance of passing in congress. maybe we should be talking about that as well. >> maybe i am just a -- i don't know. sad, angry person here, but i don't believe that we're going to get something comprehensive that deals with assault weapons and background checks and mental health and everything else. you're going to have to choose, pick your spots. >> no, but that's part of the issue i think that's going to unfold in the off-year elections. john again is right. there is broad support here for things like universal background checks. in fact, you know, i think approval approach 90% as a pollster, we never see anything sort of much above 80%, 90%. br
at the scene in midland city, alabama. what's the latest? >> reporter: no resolution as the hostage standoff goes into a fifth afternoon. however, authorities say they are in constant communication with 65-year-old jimmy lee dykes communicating through the pvc pipe that provides ventilation from the surface to his underground bunker. authorities say they have no reason to believe that any physical harm has come to the 5-year-old hostage. listen. >> mr. dykes, through our communications we've been able to -- he's told us that he's got an electric heater and some blankets inside and he's taking care of him. he's also allowed us to provide coloring books medication toys. >> reporter: and the sheriff goes on to say i want to thank him for taking care of our child, that is very important. the 5-year-old boy was abducted from this school bus that you're looking at in this video tuesday afternoon. that's when the abduction occurred. witnesses say a gunman came on board the bus demanding hodges and shot the driver when the school bus driver tried to confront the gunman. charles poland jr. that schoo
explosion and fast-moving flames race through a popular kansas city district full of shops and restaurants. >> what investigators are finding this morning after a fire that burned for hours. it's wednesday, february 20th. >>> from abc news, this is "world news now." >>> good morning, everybody. i'm rob nelson. >> and i'm diana perez. we'll get to the kansas city fire investigation in just a moment in our top story. >>> also this morning, the costly computer crimes costing the american economy hundreds of billions of dollars a year. the fingers are pointing at china, as the white house announces plans to fight the hackers. >>> and this is crazy. why hand sanitizer is being singled out in a fire that severely burned an 11-year-old girl. wait until you hear how something so common turned into something so hazardous. you think you're doing the right thing, killing the germs, all the dirt in our workplace and homes and something like that happens. that story is crazy. >> and where it happened is also crazy. >>> and later on, clyde davis, his tell-all book, his big secrets, and a singing star wh
york city, ed koch. he will be warmly remembered. president bill clinton will be speaking there at the funeral today. the mayor who famously asked everybody, how am i doing all across the city. he was really beloved by a bipartisan gathering of new yorkers i would say and today he will be remembered at temple emanuel at new york city. that will be quite a service i would imagine there. >> there are so many ed koch stories to go around. the "new york post" the other day answered his famous line with a front page that said, you did great. he was a beloved mayor of new york city. martha: yeah, indeed he was and he is being remembered right now. more on that later. gregg, thank you for being with us today. >> my pleasure. martha: we'll see you back here tomorrow and "happening now" starts right now. jenna: right now we have brand new stories and breaking news. >> the little boy at the center of the hostage drama, tense negotiations to get him free and the high-tech surveillance equipment now helping investigators. >>> also the troop drawdown in afghanistan. new reaction from i
city, the editor-in-chief, they sent us the editor-in-chief. >> that's huge. >> take us through this fascinate i fascinating governorial race. the former chief, ken cuccinelli and the former chief, terry mcauliffe. >> it's what you talk about, the divide in the republican party. ken is really conservative and the guy elbowed aside, bill boeing says there's a 50-50 chance he will run as independent. if he does, he will get a lot of independent support in virginia. the point of politics to talk to yourself and feel good about ideological ideological purity, what cuccinelli feel good about and saying neither of these guys are palatable, we don't want an old clinton hand and there's got to be a middle and the question is whether an independent candidacy might represent that. >> when you say really really conservative, how conservative is he? what do you mean? what are some of his positions? >> he's motivated by social conservati conservatism. as attorney general he got involved in this dispute in virginia where he was cracking down on scientists who disagree with his view on global
the country. supporters flooded the streets of tunis and other cities. there are reports of barricades being erected in clashes with police. >> news of the assassination sparked protests in several tunisian cities. in the capital, thousands of angry protesters followed the ambulance carrying belaid's body. many blame the islamists, an accusation the party denies. >> people know that the criminals are directly linked to the head of the party. >> all these islamist organizations have a reputation of terrorist groups. history is a witness. it is not possible to discuss, negotiate, or agree with terrorists. the government has no other choice but to resign. otherwise, the tunisian people will topple them. they must step down. >> belaid was gunned down outside his home on wednesday. he headed the secular left- leaning patriots party. his allies said the killing was calculated to cause civil unrest. >> these people want to turn tunisian into another somalia. they want to see a spiral of violence in our country. we will not fall for that. chokri will not be the last march. >> in a speech to the euro
reportedly killed at least 20 people. the mortars exploded, killing one of the players. the city of aleppo has seen some of the most intense fighting. conway filed this report. >> the night sky troubles with the sound of war, -- trembles with the sound of war. thousands have lost their lives. as the fighting spreads, many parts of syria and now look like this. rebel fighters have made any gains in the north. towns, military bases, air fields. they have the misfortune of lying beside their necks and biggest target so far. aleppo region and now they're next biggest target so far, aleppo airport. -- they have the misfortune of being beside the next biggest target so far, aleppo airport. >> this is now a key strategic target for the rebels. if they take this, not only will it have been a strategic success also an important symbolic victory. >> controlling the airport means wiping out the army. it could deal a blow to their morale and would be a major boost to us as well as giving a great military who assets. >> civilians pay the highest price for this ambition. a battle for their future that m
-year-old will spend his days praying in a vatican city monastery. though he has cited age as the reason for his retirement, an italian newspaper suggests something more controversial: they say a network of gay priests at the vatican is being blackmaled by male prostitutes. >> a los angeles cardinal who will help elect the next pope is being questioned about pedophile priests during his time as the city's archbishop. church documents suggest cardinal roger mahony knew priests were sexually abusing children. but went out of his way to protect the priests from prosecution. mahony spent several hours in a deposition on saturday, answering questions about the sex abuse scandal. a petition effort is underway to keep mahony from being allowed to vote for the next pope. >> san francisco celebreated the year of the snake is a big way. as chinese new year celebrations took center stage in san francisco saturday night. this is video of the grand finale of the celebration. the colorful dragon wrapping up the parade. there and shows us the spectacle of the largest new year celebration outside of chi
city, where more than 100,000 gathered in stst. peter's square to hear pope benedict read the angelus to the faithful one final time. anne thompson joins us. the world just saw benedict xvi on that balcony window for the last time. what's the mood been there to y today? >> reporter: i think a lot of gratitude and also sadness to see him retire. but peoplens why he wants to retire. he's 85. he told the crowd that he's not going to abandon the church, alex. he said that in instead god has asked him to lave life of more prayer and meditation, and he says that's more appropriate for someone of his age and his strengths. >> yeah. you know, not to besmirch all this, but there were some reports circulating in some italian papers about blackmail being a reason why the pope was stepping down. how does the vatican address that? >> the vatican has come back very strongly against those reports, alex. they were in a paper called la republica this past week. and the vatican took the unusual step yesterday, the vatican secretary of state, of calling -- of issuing a statement calling the situation b
warfare are both relatively recent inventions. they were only made possible by the rise of the first city-states in mesopotamia about 5,000 years ago. by definition you could not have a conventional army without a state, and so until you had states, you had no conventional armies which had officers and enlisted ranks and a bureaucracy and logistics and all these other things that we associate with conventional armed forces. but guess what? as soon as you had the very first city-states in mesopotamia, they were immediately being attacked by know e mass from the persian -- nomads from the persian highlands. essentially, guerrillas. and so from the very start organized militaries have always spent a lot of their time fighting unconventional, irregular warfare. and you know what? those terms don't make a heck of a lot ofceps. that's one of the big takeaways i had from doing six years of reading and research for this book. the way we think about this spire subject is all messed up -- entire subject is all messed up. we think that somehow conventional warfare is the norm, that the way you ought
city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: madeleine albright is here. she was secretary of sta fro 1997 to001. her approach to american foreign policy was marked by a muscular commitment to the ideal of democracy. her story began in far away lands, she was born in czechoslovakia before the start of world war ii. she looks back at her childhood in her latest book called "prague winter: a personal story of remembrance and war." the paper back version is just out. i am pleased to have her on this program. welcome. >> wonderful to visit you. thank you. >> rose: you told me about this wonderful organization that you have started which is called -- which is all about the former foreign ministers around the world. >> it's sponsored by aspin, it's the aspin foreign ministers forum we its unofficial name is madeleine and her exes. >> rose: (laughs) >> and we meet a couple times a year talk and share a lot of experience. i have a business, i have a global consulting firm and i teach at georgetown and i'm chairman of the board of the national democratic institute which is something that was started i
different countries and cities around the world. all you have to do is go up to the atm and there's a simple message on the screen. it says get 100 euros or the equivalent of $130 without a card. it says you can get $131 but there's a catch, you have to share it. so it will respond. if you say do you want the money, you say yes, but only if you agree to share it. it says do you need any suggestions where you want to give your money to? you can hire a store retailer for the kids in your neighborhood, buy diapers for a pregnant woman. then the atm gives you the cash, free money. no obligation to actually do what you just agreed to do. but the good news is that there are people who actually went out and did it. the majority of the people who grabbed the money from the atm shared it with their fellow man. so there are good people in the world. >> this is in america or overseas? >> it's overseas. it hasn't happened in america yet. let's see if americans are as kind. free money goes right into the pocket. >> there are angels everywhere. this is a cool story, too. there's this guy, a dutch entrepre
cities or places that are more neutral to it. it is certainly hard to prejudge the outcome of these talks. the foreign minister at a security conference in munich over the weekend was making positive noises about what could be achieved in the new obama administration, the second term you about it is ultimately the supreme leader who calls the shots. certainly the fact that iran told the u.n. nuclear watchdog last week it was going to be deploying a significant number of second generation centrifuges that can spin uranium three times as fast as ones currently used is not a sign of stepping back, jenna. it is certainly a sign of moving quickly along. there are some experts who think that actually more rigorous, intensive, sustained negotiations at this point will be more useful than sanctions. then there are different opinions at this point about this point of no return. some say it his iran has enough fissile materiel it could make a nuclear warhead. and that would be this summer by many estimates. others are saying that red line point is when iran can do that but do it in a way that is un
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 129 (some duplicates have been removed)